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Monday, June 29, 2015

Shaun's Rambles 003: On Negative Reviews and Their Value

...in which I talk about things some people don't want to write.

In this edition:

  • A discussion of the value of negative book reviews and why I think many people, including me, are hesitant to write them.
Enjoy the rambles!

You can download the mp3 directly from this link or stream the episode below.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Shaun's Rambles 002: The Value of Book Reviews and Dark Orbit by Carolyn Ives Gilman

...in which I continue a podcast of random thoughts had while driving home from work.

In this edition:
Enjoy the rambles.

You can download the mp3 directly from this link or stream the episode below.

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Shaun's Rambles 001: The Gallo Conspiracy and Trial By Fire

...in which I begin a podcast of random thoughts had while driving home from work.

In this edition:

  • Some thoughts on the controversy over Irene Gallo's statements about the Sad / Rabid Puppies
  • Some thoughts on Trial By Fire by Charles Gannon and the absence of sf/f awards for adventure fiction
Enjoy the rambles.

You can download the mp3 directly from this link or stream the episode below.

Friday, June 05, 2015

On the SF/F Novel: What Happened to Short Novels?

Later tonight, I'm recording an episode of The Incomparable with Jason Snell, Scott McNulty, Paul Weimer, and Fred Kiesche.  We'll be discussing the Nebula Awards novel finalists, and among the topics I intend to bring up is the fact that I have been bouncing off of novels hard lately.

In the last few months, I've increasingly become weary of novels over 300 pages, and even more weary of novels exceeding 500.  Part of this comes from experience:  over and over, I'll pick up a novel of that length and come to the realization that it should have been cut down by 30% to avoid bloated side stories.  There are all kinds of reasons that a novel should be trimmed, from excessive "as you know, Bob" explanations (a trait that Kim Stanley Robinson has somehow avoided in his exposition-heavy work) to simple elongations of otherwise tight narratives are pretty common.  In other words, novel bloat is the primary culprit.